Overview

When

Monday, November 13, 2017 8:30AM-4:30PM -
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:00AM-4:30PM

Where

Renaissance Arboretum Hotel
9721 Arboretum Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78759
USA


Event Coverage

Photo Gallery

Please see below for a selection of images from our 2015 Innovations conference. Click an image below to see a larger version.


Program Book

For an offline version of conference speakers, sessions and abstract information, please review our conference program book.

2017 Innovations Conference Book

Registration

Conference registration is still open! Register by visiting register.cprit2017.org.

The Renaissance Arboretum Hotel is booked but you can still make hotel reservations for November 13-14, 2017, at the Embassy Suites Hotel Austin-Arboretum here.

The rate is $179 and includes a breakfast buffet, complimentary Wi-Fi, and a complimentary shuttle to the Renaissance and anywhere in a three mile radius.


Abstracts

Poster Set-Up: Sunday, November 12, 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. and Monday, November 13, 7:30 – 9:00 a.m.

Poster boards are 84 inches wide by 42 inches long; pins will be provided.

See schedule of events for poster session times and location.

Questions about abstracts? Contact CPRIT at abstracts@cprit.texas.gov.


Schedule

See below for the current listing of the sessions at our 2017 Innovations conference. Please note that this schedule is subject to change. Please check back often to see the latest updates.

Session Legend

    Plenary     Research     Prevention     Product Development     Joint     Posters     General

Monday, November 13

8:30 AM
CPRIT: Today and Tomorrow 
Speakers

Wayne Roberts 
Chief Executive Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Wayne Roberts was named Chief Executive Officer of the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) in November 2013 after serving since December 2012 as the Interim Executive Director. 

Prior to four years with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston as Associate Vice President for Public Policy, Mr. Roberts' career was weighted towards public finance and budget, especially with respect to higher education. He held numerous senior positions under Governor Rick Perry in which, among other things, he authored the white paper and draft legislation creating the Texas Emerging Technology Fund to catalyze economic development, including transferring research conducted at universities to the Texas marketplace.

Mr. Roberts served Governor George W. Bush as Deputy and Acting State Budget Director. He was Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock’s special assistant for budget and human services following 18 years with the Legislative Budget Board.

He received a B.A.with honors and special honors in government from The University of Texas at Austin and a masters from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at UT.

 

Welcome - CPRIT Oversight Committee Presiding Officer 
Speakers

Will Montgomery 
Presiding Officer, Oversight Committee
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Mr. Montgomery is a partner at Jackson Walker LLP, where his practice focuses on commercial litigation and arbitration. He is experienced in all aspects of litigation, including jury and non-jury trials, arbitration, and mediation.

In recent comments, he expressed a personal stake in helping to steer CPRIT toward success in championing treatments and cures for cancer: "Cancer is a scourge that has touched families throughout Texas, including my own," Montgomery told D Healthcare Daily. "My father was a cancer researcher, ironically contracting cancer late in his life. My brother recently died of cancer. I am honored to have the opportunity to serve the state and to help accomplish CPRIT's mission to educate, prevent, and discover causes and possible cures for cancer."

Mr. Montgomery was admitted to the Texas State Bar in 1984. He received his BA and his MA degrees from Stanford University. He received his JD degree from the University of Chicago.
9:05 AM
Precision Medicine in Cancer Prevention, Screening, and Treatment: The HPV Paradigm 
Precision (personalized) medicine often refers to interventions for the treatment of established disease, such as cancer. However, the principles of precision medicine – interventions based on a molecular understanding of disease – are equally relevant to cancer prevention and screening. Recognition of HPV infection as the main cause of cervical cancer and a high proportion of several other cancers has led to several successful etiology-based interventions. They include: 1) primary prevention of HPV-associated cancers by FDA-approved HPV vaccines; 2) secondary prevention of cervical cancer by FDA-approved HPV-based screening; and 3) treatment of HPV-associated cancer by candidate interventions directed against HPV-encoded proteins in the cancer. The treatment approach may improve the outlook and clinical outcome for patients who develop HPV-associated cancers, while the prevention and screening approaches have the long-term potential to eliminate these cancers as a worldwide public health problem. The relevance of these advances to other cancers, including tumors not attributable to infectious oncogenic agents, will be discussed.
Speakers

Doug Lowy, MD 
Chief, Laboratory of Cellular Oncology and Senior Investigator Head, Signaling and Oncogenesis Section
National Cancer Institute

Since 2010, Dr. Lowy has helped to lead NCI’s key scientific initiatives. A cancer researcher for more than 40 years, Dr. Lowy received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama in 2014 for his research that led to the development of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. As chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology in the Center for Cancer Research at NCI, Dr. Lowy’s research includes the biology of papillomaviruses and the regulation of normal and neoplastic growth. For his pioneering work, Dr. Lowy has received numerous honors in addition to the National Medal, including the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award, the 2011 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award and the Federal Employee of the Year Award in 2007 from the Partnership for Public Service.

10:00 AM
Evolving Developments In Immunotherapy: A Look at the Future 
Creative new ways to stimulate the immune system against cancer, including molecularly engineering T-cells continue to emerge daily. The dramatic and long-lasting results seen in responding patients have bolstered the efforts of the scientific community. Attend this session to hear the current state of the art in immunotherapy as well as future directions. 
Moderators

Patrick Hwu, MD 
Head of the Division of Cancer Medicine; Chair, Departments of Melanoma and Sarcoma Medical Oncology
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Hwu is a tumor immunologist focused on the areas of vaccines, adoptive T-cell therapies, and immune resistance. His research and clinical efforts have led to insights and advances in the understanding of the interactions between tumors and the immune system, and the development of cellular therapies. He is the principal investigator on several peer-reviewed grants including NIH translational immunotherapy R01s. Based on the work in his lab, several ongoing clinical trials have resulted, including a trial of T-cells gene-modified to enhance resistance against TGF-b. Most recently, his preclinical studies have focused on combinations of immune checkpoint blockade and T-cell therapy, as well as rational combinations of targeted therapies and immunotherapies. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to cancer research, Dr. Hwu has held endowed positions since joining the institution. He currently holds the Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan Distinguished University Chair at MD Anderson.

Speakers

Harpreet Singh, PhD 
Chief Executive Officer
Immatics US, Inc.

With help from a CPRIT grant, Dr. Singh co-founded Immatics US, Inc. As Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH managing director and chief scientific officer, he is dedicated to the translation of science into highly innovative cancer immunotherapeutics. At Immatics GmbH, Dr. Singh leads a team dedicated to target and TCR discovery, immunology, manufacturing, and translational development. Dr. Singh holds numerous patents and is the co-author of 30 publications in peer-reviewed journals, including Nature Medicine, Nature Biotechnology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Brain and Blood.

Helen Heslop, MD 
Associate Director for Clinical Research
Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Heslop oversees several peer-reviewed clinical research projects, including: an NCI-funded program project grant (Enhancing T-Cell Therapy of Cancer), a SPORE grant in Lymphoma, and a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Specialized Center of Research (SCOR) award. A Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist, Dr. Heslop has extensive experience in mentoring both clinical and laboratory trainees. She has extensive experience with clinical cell therapy studies, and serves with Dr. Malcolm Brenner and Bambi Grilley as sponsor for more than 20 active cell and gene therapy INDs.

Jennifer Wargo, MD, MMSc 
Associate Professor, Department of Surgical Oncology, Division of Surgery and Department of Genomic Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Wargo's research focuses on critical studies to better understand the effects of BRAF inhibition on immune responses in melanoma, and establishing a unique set of serial tumor biopsies and blood samples from patients enrolled in clinical trials on BRAF inhibitors. Through analysis of these samples, she has contributed significantly to the world literature regarding resistance mechanisms and the effect of targeted therapy on anti-tumor immunity. In September 2013, MD Anderson Cancer Center recruited Dr. Wargo to continue this work and to build a program to collect serial biopsies in patients with melanoma and other cancers on targeted therapy and immunotherapy, and to better understand responses to therapy and to develop novel strategies to combat resistance.

11:30 AM
Lunch Provided - No Program
12:30 PM
Product Development Research Company Showcase 

CPRIT has invested in the development of over 30 novel cancer products including immunotherapies, drugs, biologics, molecular diagnostics, devices, and services. This session provides an opportunity for attendees to hear about the research and development of promising new products and services. Company representatives will provide 15-minute overviews of their innovative new offerings. Each company will have a table set up in the Glass Oaks Ballroom to answer questions and interact with attendees. 

Moderators

Mike Lang 
Chief Product Development Research Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Mike Lang leads CPRIT’s product development research program, designed to accelerate the progression of new cancer drugs, diagnostics, and therapies from the laboratory into clinical practice. His multi-state experience includes founding and serving as chief executive officer of a cancer diagnostic company, serial entrepreneurship, and managing a portfolio for an early stage investment. Prior to joining CPRIT in November 2015, Mr. Lang was the founder and CEO of NanoVision, a cancer diagnostics company. He headed business development at the venture capital-funded wound healing company Gilatech, where he led its novel biomaterial therapy. Lang oversaw a company restructuring as president of Dallas-based Galt Medical, served as a product manager at Johnson & Johnson, and was vice president of business development at BioEnterprise, where he directed the startup and growth of early stage firms. Mr. Lang has a BS in biomedical engineering from Northern Arizona University and a MBA from Arizona State University.
Epigenome-Environment Interactions — Impact on Cancer Risk and Targets for Prevention  

Our expanding knowledge about the role of epigenomic alterations in cancer has opened the door for understanding how epigenome-environment interactions drive the development of this disease, and provided new opportunities for identifying strategies that can exploit epigenomic plasticity for cancer prevention. Importantly, environmental exposures that occur early in life can have a profound effect on the epigenome of developing tissues, altering the epigenome in ways that persist long after the initial exposure. This type of "developmental reprogramming” of the epigenome can persist into adulthood, and dramatically increase cancer risk across the life course. To address this important new area of research, Baylor College of Medicine has established the Center for Precision Environmental Health, where  faculty work to understand the causes of cancer and other diseases through research at the intersection of genetics/epigenetics, environmental health and data science (GxExD). Attend this session to hear more about recent insights into how the environment affects cancer risk, and how our growing knowledge in the area of epigenome-environment interactions is presenting new opportunities for interventions targeting the epigenome to reduce cancer risk. 

Speakers

Cheryl Lyn Walker, MD 
Director, Center for Precision Environmental Health
Baylor College of Medicine

A renowned molecular biologist, Dr. Walker joined the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine to develop its Center for Precision Environmental Health. She also currently directs the NIEHS Center for Translational Environmental Health Research, and serves on the board of Scientific Advisors for the National Cancer Institute and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Medicine and Engineering Committee on Gulf War and Health. An international leader in environmental carcinogenesis and elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease, Dr. Walker’s studies on the role of the epigenome in gene-environment interactions have yielded significant insights into mechanisms by which early life exposures influence health and disease across the life course. Her work has also led to the discovery of new tumor suppressor functions in the cell and a dual role for the cell’s epigenetic machinery in regulating both chromatin and the cytoskeleton. She has been recognized with the Dallas-Ft. Worth Living Legend Faculty Achievement Award in Basic Research from MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Cozzarrelli Prize from the National Academy of Sciences, the 2015 Outstanding Distinguished Scientist Award from Sigma Xi, and the 2016 Leading Edge in Basic Research Award from the Society of Toxicology.

Margaret Kripke, PhD 
Professor Emerita
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Best known for her work in immunology of skin cancer, Dr. Kripke showed that chronic exposure to UV radiation produces cancers that are highly antigenic and that immune alterations induced by UV are responsible for tumor survival and spread. She discovered that mice exposed to UV radiation develop a selective, systemic immune suppression, and her work led to a new field of photoimmunology. Dr. Kripke’s research has provided insight into how an immune system compromised by UV radiation contributes to the development of melanoma and increased vulnerability to infectious diseases.

Dr. Kripke established a new basic research department at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and later served as vice president for academic programs and executive vice president and chief academic officer. She has been a leader in many organizations dedicated to research and collaboration and has contributed substantially to the field of environmental science. She served as CPRIT's Chief Scientific Officer from 2012 to 2015.

1:45 PM
Product Development Research Company Showcase - cont.
Moderators

Mike Lang 
Chief Product Development Research Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Mike Lang leads CPRIT’s product development research program, designed to accelerate the progression of new cancer drugs, diagnostics, and therapies from the laboratory into clinical practice. His multi-state experience includes founding and serving as chief executive officer of a cancer diagnostic company, serial entrepreneurship, and managing a portfolio for an early stage investment. Prior to joining CPRIT in November 2015, Mr. Lang was the founder and CEO of NanoVision, a cancer diagnostics company. He headed business development at the venture capital-funded wound healing company Gilatech, where he led its novel biomaterial therapy. Lang oversaw a company restructuring as president of Dallas-based Galt Medical, served as a product manager at Johnson & Johnson, and was vice president of business development at BioEnterprise, where he directed the startup and growth of early stage firms. Mr. Lang has a BS in biomedical engineering from Northern Arizona University and a MBA from Arizona State University.
Liquid Biopsies: State of the Science for Early Detection, Diagnosis 

Liquid biopsies to test for tumor products in blood and other body fluids promise a less invasive way of evaluating patients with cancer than traditional methods. Although numerous companies currently market liquid biopsies, commercial applications remain largely limited to improving treatment selection for late-stage cancers and monitoring for recurrence. Research and funding are increasing as companies work to improve methodologies and results, as well as to broaden the market. Pushing development into earlier cancer stages for screening, surveillance and diagnosis has high priority. Attend this session to hear an update on the process as well as presentations of successful examples.

Moderators

Stanley R. Hamilton, MD 
Professor and Head of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Hamilton has been involved in research and clinical applications of the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal neoplasms since 1982. Of his 341 peer-reviewed publications, over 200 address this topic, including two of the earliest evaluations of genomics as prognostic markers in colorectal adenocarcinoma. In addition, Dr. Hamilton has been active in the cooperative oncology group clinical trials setting for 25 years as a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, now the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group in the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). He has published correlative studies of molecular biomarkers using specimens from ECOG clinical trials. The clinical laboratories at UTMDACC under his direction provided the pre-analytics and analytics for 2,843 tumors for E5202, the first integral-marker phase III clinical trial in colon cancer in the NCI cooperative group setting, and 5,946 tumors for NCI-MATCH (EAY131). Dr. Hamilton is a member of the ECOG-ACRIN Leadership as Deputy Chair for Laboratory Science.

Speakers

Anirban Maitra, MBBS 
Professor of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology Scientific Director, Sheikh Ahmed Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research Co-Leader, MD Anderson Pancreatic Cancer Moon Shot™
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Maitra is Professor of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Scientific Director of the Sheikh Ahmed Bin Zayed Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research (since August 1, 2013). Over the past decade, his group has made several seminal observations in the biology and genetics of pancreatic cancer. His laboratory has access to large numbers of well annotated samples of pancreatic adenocarcinomas and precursor lesions, as well as human patient derived xenograft models. He also has extensive expertise with genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer, and with experimental therapeutics and drug development for this disease.

Victor Ugaz, PhD 
Professor, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering
Texas A&M University

Victor M. Ugaz, Ph.D. is a Professor and Holder of the Charles D. Holland ’53 Professorship in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University. He joined the faculty in January 2003, with research interests focused on microfluidic transport phenomena. His research focuses broadly on harnessing the unique characteristics of transport and flow at the microscale, with specific interests in microfluidic flows (both single-phase and nanoparticle suspensions), microchip gel electrophoresis, PCR thermocycling in novel convective flow devices, and construction of 3D vascular flow networks for biomedical applications. Ugaz earned BS and MS degrees in Aerospace Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, and a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University. He currently serves as Chair of the interdisciplinary Master of Biotechnology (MBIOT) program, Assistant Agency Director for Research Development in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M, and has served as past President of the American Electrophoresis Society (AES).
3:00 PM
Product Development Research Company Showcase - cont.
Poster (Group A)

Tuesday, November 14

8:00 AM
When Precision Medicine Is Not So Precise 

In the prime of life, an avid runner, Dr. Neil Spector, who trained at the top academic institutions became deathly ill from a mysterious illness. His doctors were baffled and attributed his unusual symptoms to stress, with nothing glaringly abnormal showing up on routine laboratory testing. After four years of fighting to stay alive and convince his doctors there was something medically wrong, a diagnosis was finally made and appropriate treatment administered. Dr. Spector will discuss how he miraculously overcame all the odds, the importance of balancing the science of precision medicine and the “art” of medicine and the lessons that he learned as a physician-scientist who found himself on the other side of a highly complex medical healthcare system.

Speakers

Neil Spector, MD 
Director of the Developmental Therapeutics Program, Duke Cancer Institute
Duke University

Author of "Gone in a Heartbeat: A Physician’s Search for True Healing," Neil Spector, MD, is a leader in applying translational research to the clinical development of molecularly targeted personalized cancer therapies. He broke through conventional thinking to bring new treatment options to the arsenal of breast cancer drugs, fought to include rare subtypes in clinical trials, and worked to develop collaborations that helped transform laboratory successes into real therapies for patients. His application of translational research to the preclinical and clinical development of lapatinib remains an example of how precision oncology can transform treatment of cancer patients, and facilitate the development of targeted cancer therapies. Dr. Spector is currently the Sandra Coates Chair in Breast Cancer Research at the Duke University School of Medicine, leader of the Duke Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Program, and he was selected by his peers as a Komen Research Scholar. In addition to his research, Dr. Spector continues to see oncology patients and was recently appointed National Director of Precision Oncology for the VA Healthcare System.

8:45 AM
Diet, Obesity, Lifestyle and Cancer: Risk and Survival  
Drs. Colditz and Fuchs will draw on their extensive experience and the evidence on diet, obesity and lifestyle as modifiable causes of cancer and the potential for lifestyle modification to improve outcomes after cancer. Growing evidence reviewed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer shows that obesity is a cause of cancer arising in 13 different organs. Dietary intake in childhood and adolescence may modify risk of breast and other cancers. Integrating lifestyle exposures across the life course may expand the potential proportion of cancer than can be prevented through available evidence based strategies.
Moderators

Ross Brownson, PhD 
Professor and Director, Prevention Research Center
Brown School and School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis

Chair of a CPRIT Prevention Review Panel, Dr. Brownson is the Bernard Becker professor at Washington University in St. Louis, with appointments in the Brown School and the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center. He is currently involved in numerous community-level studies designed to understand and reduce modifiable risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, and tobacco use. In particular, he is interested in the impacts of environmental and policy interventions on cancer risk factors and he conducts research on dissemination of evidence-based interventions with a focus on policy settings and health departments. Dr. Brownson has authored nine books and more than 450 peer-reviewed articles.

Speakers

Charles Fuchs, MD, MPH 
Director, Yale Cancer Center and Physician-in-Chief of Smilow Cancer Hospital
Yale University

An internationally recognized expert in gastrointestinal cancers and cancer epidemiology, Dr. Fuchs was previously professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the gastrointestinal oncology division and the Robert T. and Judith B. Hale Chair in Pancreatic Cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Fuchs conducts research in gastrointestinal cancer epidemiology. In addition to studying the influence of diet and lifestyle, his research team is looking at the influence of such biomarkers as insulin-like growth factors, steroid hormones, and polymorphisms of metabolism enzymes on the risk of these cancers. Dr. Fuchs also conducts research assessing various treatment regimens and new drugs for gastrointestinal cancers.

Graham Colditz, DrPH, MD, MPH 
Associate Director Prevention and Control
Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis

As an epidemiologist and public health expert, Dr. Colditz has a longstanding interest in the preventable causes of chronic disease, particularly among women. An internationally recognized leader in cancer prevention, Dr. Colditz is interested in strategies to speed translation of research findings to prevention strategies that work. His past research has focused on the health effects of smoking, weight and weight gain, physical activity, diet, and the adverse effects of medications such as postmenopausal hormone therapy, documenting that current use increases risk of breast cancer.

 

10:00 AM
Posters (Group B)
11:30 AM
Lunch Provided - No Program
12:30 PM
Clinical Trial Design 

The session will cover the general concept of clinical trial design for oncology focused trials. In addition to the basic design concepts that have been in practice for years, the session will focus on newer design elements that allow sponsors to reduce the time and cost of therapeutic products clinical trials. Additionally, the session will focus on specific considerations for testing immuno-oncology products, the latest guidance from the FDA, and novel trends that will shape future trial design.

Speakers

George Peoples, COL (ret), MD, FACS 
Founder and CEO
Cancer Insight, LLC and the Cancer Vaccine Development Program (CVDP), Metis Foundation

After retiring from 30 years of active duty as a military surgeon and research scientist, Dr. Peoples created Cancer Insight, LLC. The clinical research and development organization currently conducts multiple phase I and II trials at 50 plus sites across the United States. He also continues his work with CVDP discovering, developing, and clinical testing of cancer vaccines. Additionally, Dr. Peoples is a professor of surgery at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and an adjunct professor of Surgical Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is the past Chair of the Cancer Program, San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the past Deputy Director of the United States Military Cancer Institute. Dr. Peoples served as the Chief of Surgical Oncology at Walter Reed Amy Medical Center and at SAMMC. He has written extensively on the immune response to cancer with more than 350 peer-reviewed manuscripts, abstracts, and book chapters.

 

Progress on Childhood Cancer Research  

With cancer still serving as the leading cause of death from disease among children and adolescents, researchers are working to make progress in key areas. Join this session to hear about specific research projects to develop more effective treatment for childhood cancer and learn about future research and prevention directions.

Moderators

Stephen X. Skapek, MD 
Chief, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Dr. Skapek believes that caring for children with cancer requires both clinical and research excellence. He leads one of the larger pediatric cancer programs in the United States, comprising some 25 faculty physicians who all have established and growing expertise in specific areas of childhood cancer and blood disorders. He also leads a research lab that focuses on tumor-suppressor genes in soft-tissue sarcomas. Dr. Skapek holds the UT Southwestern Distinguished Chair in Pediatric Oncology Research. He also serves as Medical Director of the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas. Dr. Skapek serves on several leadership committees for the international Children’s Oncology Group, the world’s largest clinical research organization focused on childhood cancers. He is also a member of the Association for Research and Vision Ophthalmology, the American Society of Pediatric Oncology, and the American Association of Cancer Research.

Speakers

Abbey Berenson, MD, PhD 
Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Women's Health
The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Dr. Berenson's research interests involve improving women's health from puberty to menopause. She has maintained extramural support for her studies in adolescents and young women since 1994.  Currently, she is leading cancer prevention projects aimed at increasing uptake of the  human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.  Her projects include offering the vaccine to young women while they are patients on the postpartum unit, providing one-one counseling on HPV, HPV-related cancers, and the HPV vaccine to mothers of children seen in pediatric clinics, and outreach to young men and women in medically underserved areas of the Golden Triangle.  She has published 40 papers in peer-review journals and presented her CPRIT projects at a number of conference, including those in Lisbon and CapeTown.

Barry Maurer, MD, PhD 
Associate Professor
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Dr. Maurer is a board-certified pediatric oncologist and academic developmental cancer researcher conducting basic laboratory investigations and early phase clinical trials. His major interests are the cellular mechanisms, translational development, and clinical testing of the cytotoxic retinoid, fenretinide, as a dihydroceramide-increasing agent, both as a single agent and in combination with other modulators of ceramide pathways in adult and pediatric tumor systems. He currently holds two investigator-initiated, FDA investigational new drug applications related to this research.

Brendan Lee, MD, PhD 
Chairman, Molecular and Human Genetics
Baylor College of Medicine

As a pediatrician and geneticist, the overall mission of Dr. Lee’s research program is to translate the study of structural birth defects and inborn errors of metabolism into a basic understanding of development, disease and novel therapeutic approaches. His long standing interest has been the study of human inborn errors of metabolism and structural birth defects of the skeleton. In the study of metabolism, he has applied genetic approaches to the study of biochemical genetic disorders (specifically urea cycle disorders) as models of complex disease (those involving nitric oxide dysregulation). In the study of structural birth defects, his research team has discovered paracrine and endocrine signaling pathways that regulate skeletal development including morphogens (TGFb, Wnt and Notch), post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs, and extracellular matrix protein modifications (e.g., collagen prolyl-hydroxylation), and their contribution to cancers both intrinsic and metastatic to
bone.

James Amatruda MD, PhD 
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular Biology and Internal Medicine
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

A physician-scientist, Dr. Amatruda divides his time between his research laboratory and Children’s Medical Center, Dallas, where he specializes in the care of children with cancer and blood disorders. Research in his lab focuses on understanding the genetic causes of childhood cancers, including genitourinary cancers and sarcomas, using zebrafish models and human genomic approaches. At UT Southwestern, Dr. Amatruda is the Associate Division Director for Research in the Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, and Assistant Director of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He also serves as Chair of the Germ Cell Tumor Biology and Rare Tumors Biology committees in the Children’s Oncology Group.

Joshua Mendell, MD, PhD 
Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Dr. Mendell has made major contributions to the understanding of the mechanisms that govern gene expression in normal physiology and cancer, and his research group has been at the forefront of dissecting the contributions of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other noncoding RNAs to these processes. Dr. Mendell’s laboratory provided one of the first demonstrations that miRNAs function as components of critical oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways and that miRNAs represent potent and non-toxic anti-cancer therapeutic agents when delivered systemically.  More recently, the Mendell laboratory has demonstrated that other types of noncoding RNAs, including long noncoding RNAs, similarly regulate cancer-relevant processes including genomic stability.  Dr. Mendell has been the recipient of several awards including the Allan C. Davis Medal for the Outstanding Young Scientist in the State of Maryland in 2007, the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research in 2010, and the O’Donnell Award from the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas in 2016.  Dr. Mendell was appointed as an HHMI Early Career Scientist in 2009 and an HHMI Investigator in 2015.  In 2011, Dr. Mendell received a Rising Stars Award from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and relocated his laboratory from Johns Hopkins to UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas where he is currently a Professor of Molecular Biology and member of the Simmons Cancer Center and Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine.

Peter Houghton, PhD 
Professor of Molecular Medicine, Director of Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Dr. Houghton received his PhD from the Institute for Cancer Research, London University, and joined St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital where he became Chair, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, and Co-Leader for the Solid Malignancies Program. In 2009 he became Director, Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus Ohio, and from 2014 has been Director, Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. His work in developmental therapeutics, has focused largely on pediatric sarcomas. Specifically, understanding the role of insulin-like growth factors in the genesis of pediatric sarcomas, and developing approaches to inhibiting these signaling pathways. This focus led him to identify rapamycin and other rapalogs as potent inhibitors of sarcoma cell proliferation, and to map the pathway downstream of mTORC1 that is important for tumor cell proliferation. Another major focus of his work has been developing xenograft models of childhood cancers. He initiated preclinical development of the camptothecin drugs, topotecan and irinotecan that are now standard components of many pediatric clinical protocols. Dr. Houghton was the Principal Investigator of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program (PPTP), and a member of the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium where he conducts new agent evaluation against pediatric sarcoma and kidney cancer models. He is the PI on a large multi-institutional P01 grant entitled Studies of Childhood Sarcomas as well as other NIH funded grants. Dr. Houghton has over 35 years of experience in preclinical testing. Dr. Houghton has both NIH and industry support for studies involving drug combinations with ionizing radiation using human tumor xenograft models of pediatric cancer.

Dissemination and Implementation Science for Cancer Control: Realizing the Potential of Discoveries 
This session will explore recent advancements in dissemination and implementation science that are relevant to cancer prevention and control. Participants will expand their understanding of how this science can improve their work. In particular, the session will explore the potential of dissemination and implementation science, gaps in the evidence base, and opportunities for practice- and policy-based research. The session objectives are to: describe the underpinnings of implementation research; explore some dissemination research topics and gaps (illustrated with policy research); and describe resources for building D&I capacity
Speakers

Ross Brownson, PhD 
Professor and Director, Prevention Research Center
Brown School and School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis

Chair of a CPRIT Prevention Review Panel, Dr. Brownson is the Bernard Becker professor at Washington University in St. Louis, with appointments in the Brown School and the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center. He is currently involved in numerous community-level studies designed to understand and reduce modifiable risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, and tobacco use. In particular, he is interested in the impacts of environmental and policy interventions on cancer risk factors and he conducts research on dissemination of evidence-based interventions with a focus on policy settings and health departments. Dr. Brownson has authored nine books and more than 450 peer-reviewed articles.

1:20 PM
High Cancer Drug Prices: Causes, Patient Impact and Potential Solutions 

Over the past 10 years, cancer drug costs have increased in an unprecedented fashion. The rapid escalation in cancer care costs has taken a significant toll on patients and families faced with a cancer diagnosis. During this lecture, Dr. Hagop Kantarjian will detail the historical background of high cancer drug prices, discuss potential causes as well as justifications by the pharmaceutical industry, and elaborate on the harm the rising cost has on patients. The session will examine possible solutions to delivering precision-medicine solutions while maintaining an economically sustainable cancer care system. 

Speakers

Hagop M. Kantarjian, MD 
Professor and Chairman, Department of Leukemia
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Kantarjian leads the nation’s largest leukemia practice, known for its extensive participation and leadership in developing new treatments through research and clinical trials. Dr. Kantarjian has developed a number of treatments, including chemotherapy combinations and the single agent clofarabine for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL); the hypomethylating agent decitabine, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myelodysplastic syndromes in 2006; liposomal vincristine, FDA-approved in 2012 for ALL; and ruxolitinib, approved for myelofibrosis in 2011. He has also championed multiple targeted therapies for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), including imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, ponatinib, bosutinib, and omacetaxine, all of which received FDA approvals between 2001 and 2012. He is currently developing monoclonal antibodies in adult ALL. On the MD Anderson faculty since 1983, Kantarjian holds the Kelce Margaret Kana Research Chair and is associate vice president of Global Academic Programs. He was recently appointed as the Baker Institute Scholar in Health Policy.

Progress on Childhood Cancer Research - cont.
Approaches to Community Needs Assessment and Stakeholder Engagement  

This session will focus on community health needs assessment models that are evidenced-based and have been shown to be applicable for use in Texas because they offer practical ways to engage communities in cancer prevention, as well as other public and community health initiatives.  Dr. Philips will describe the purpose for and overall approach of useful public health models, with special focus on community stakeholders and how to engage them in collaborative efforts to better prevent and educate about cancer.  Dr. Stewart will offer an applied example of how these approaches are being used in a rural area to identify priorities, approaches, and partners that have begun to address local and regional cancer needs.  Discussion will follow.

Speakers

Billy U. Philips, PhD, MPH 
Executive Vice President
The F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Dr. Philips’ work focuses on improving the health and well-being of the communities of Texas using innovative and scholarly research, advanced use of technology, and comprehensive education and outreach. He is also responsible for the direction, implementation, and overall programming of telemedicine for the entire Health Sciences Center including the federally funded TexLa Telehealth Resource Center grant and demonstration projects such as the Telemedicine Wellness Intervention Triage and Referral (TWITR) Project, the Next Generation 9-1-1 Telemedicine Medical Services Pilot Project, and the Frontiers in Telemedicine Training Lab, the only one of its kind in the nation. An established NIH investigator and author of numerous books, peer-reviewed articles, and other scholarly works in community-based research and chronic diseases, Dr. Philips has a long and distinguished career supporting preventive and public health initiatives.

 

Kenneth Stewart, PhD 
Professor/Director of Community Development Initiatives
Angelo State University

Dr. Stewart established ASU’s Community Development Initiatives (CDI) in 2007 and continues to serve as its director. CDI conducts community-based research to advance community development projects in San Angelo, the Concho Valley, and West Texas. Dr. Stewart serves as program evaluator for Access to Breast and Cervical Care for West Texas (ABCC4WT), a CPRIT funded breast and cervical cancer prevention program serving a 21-county area in West Texas. He headed the community-based assessment team that conducted The Community Health Needs Assessment of the Poor and Extremely Poor in West Texas. Completed in 2015, the study revealed numerous gaps between health and behavioral health service capacities and the prevalence of chronic diseases found in the populations living below the poverty line in 20 counties of West Texas. A member of the editorial advisory board for the Rural Health Quarterly, Dr. Stewart has also published several books, numerous peer-reviewed articles, and other scholarly works on social problems, minority-majority group relations, community development, and public health.

2:25 PM
Start-up Trials and Tribulations 

Companies engaged in early-stage development often face an uphill battle. Sometimes it is years before a drug, product or service reaches the market, so pre-revenue companies must survive by periodically tapping investors for cash. Then they must navigate the turbulence of clinical trial results that can either make or break them. Clinical trials and the rules that govern them are coming under pressure for an overhaul. With the odds sometimes against them, how do start-up companies manage and secure funding and reach success? Attend this lively panel discussion on start-up trials and tribulations.

Moderators

Matt McManus, MD, PhD 
Chief Executive Officer
Asuragen, Inc

Dr. McManus joined Asuragen in August 2014 with more than 20 years of clinical diagnostic leadership experience, and was previously the CEO and president of PrimeraDx, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company marketing a novel, multiplexed, multi-modal, molecular diagnostics instrument for oncology, infectious disease, and genetic testing. Dr. McManus also served as head of Cleveland Clinic Laboratories and chief operating officer of the Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. He received an MD and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, MBA from Boston College and his bachelor's from the College of the Holy Cross.
Speakers

Fahar Merchant, PhD 
Chairman, President, CEO
Medicenna Therapeutics, Inc.

Dr. Merchant is a 25-year biotech veteran, a serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Medicenna. Previously, he was president and CEO of Protox Therapeutics where he established a late clinical stage urology company. At Protox, he raised more than $70 million through multiple PIPEs, including a $35 million investment by Warburg Pincus. In 1992, he co-founded IntelliGene Expressions, Inc., a biologics CDMO, and built it to one of the fastest growing companies in Canada. In 2000, by strategic in-licensing, he co-founded Avicenna Medica, Inc., a clinical stage oncology company that was sold a year later to KS Biomedix (LSE) for $90 million. Dr. Merchant was CTO and Director of KS Biomedix until its acquisition by Xenova. Dr. Merchant has closed several transactions valued at more than $300 million.

Harpreet Singh, PhD 
Chief Executive Officer
Immatics US, Inc.

With help from a CPRIT grant, Dr. Singh co-founded Immatics US, Inc. As Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH managing director and chief scientific officer, he is dedicated to the translation of science into highly innovative cancer immunotherapeutics. At Immatics GmbH, Dr. Singh leads a team dedicated to target and TCR discovery, immunology, manufacturing, and translational development. Dr. Singh holds numerous patents and is the co-author of 30 publications in peer-reviewed journals, including Nature Medicine, Nature Biotechnology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Brain and Blood.

Jon Northrup 
Chief Executive Officer
Beta Cat Pharmaceuticals, LLC

Currently, Mr. Northup serves as CEO of several translational oncology companies working on novel cancer therapies from bench to bed, as well as CEO of Indigo Clinical Research, a clinical data services company in India. Mr. Northup is a published author with several articles and frequent presentations within the industry as well as two books – “The Pharmaceutical Industry” chapter in The Business of Healthcare Innovation and Prescription Pricing in Chain and Independent Pharmacies. Mr. Northup worked for Eli Lilly and Company in a variety of executive positions in Corporate Strategy, Business Development, Marketing, and Sales for more than 28 years. During that time, he led 50 collaborations with other pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and participated on the launch team of many Lilly products, including Prozac, Axid, Humatrope, and Humulin.

Dissemination and Implementation – Strategies and Examples 
One of CPRIT’s objectives is to facilitate the dissemination and implementation of successful CPRIT funded projects by supporting the development of resources based on these projects. Four recipients of the Dissemination of CPRIT –Funded Cancer Control Interventions (DI) award will discuss strategies and processes for the effective adaptation and implementation of their projects as well as showcase resources and products to assist those interested in adapting and implementing their evidence based interventions while maintaining fidelity to the original program. 
Moderators

Rebecca Garcia, PhD 
Chief Prevention and Communications Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Dr. Rebecca Garcia leads CPRIT’s prevention and communications efforts. Ten percent of CPRIT's total funding is dedicated to evidence-based prevention services. Her responsibilities include directing the prevention program and fostering collaboration among the cancer and disease prevention community to maximize CPRIT's impact. In addition, she is responsible for overseeing CPRIT’s strategic communications efforts. Prior to joining CPRIT in August of 2009, she served as Vice President, Continuing Professional Development, for Physicians' Education Resource (PER), a medical education and communications company. Previously, Dr. Garcia was Vice President of Health Sciences for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure where she managed Komen’s scientific research grants and education programs. Dr. Garcia attended the University of Texas at Austin and received a bachelor's degree in medical technology from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas. She obtained a master's degree in Biomedical Communications at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas and a doctorate from the Department of Higher Education at the University of North Texas.
Speakers

Jane Bolin, PhD, JD, BSH 
Center Director, Health Policy and Management
Texas A&M Health Science Center

Dr. Bolin has served as co-principal investigator on three CPRIT cancer prevention grants on screening for colorectal, breast and cervical cancer in a low-income uninsured population and PI on one dissemination grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. She is also the director of the federally funded Southwest Rural Health Research Center at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, conducting policy-relevant research for the benefit of rural and underserved areas of Texas and the nation. As a professor at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, Dr. Bolin’s other academic interests include public health law, health disparities, evidence-based interventions, community-based participatory research and chronic disease, particularly diabetes.

Lorraine Reitzel, PhD, FAAHB 
Principal Investigator, Department of Psychological, Health & Learning Sciences
University of Houston

Dr. Reitzel’s research program focuses on better understanding the social determinants of health and health risk behaviors, as well as the specific biopsychosocial mechanisms that account for disparities in health risk behaviors and health outcomes. Her CPRIT-supported work is focused on the dissemination and implementation of a multi-component tobacco-free workplace program within behavioral health centers across Texas. She co-founded and currently co-directs the HEALTH Research Institute, a hub for the university’s community-informed translational research aimed at reducing health disparities and promoting health equity in Houston. She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed empirical articles, is a fellow of the American Academy of Health Behavior, and serves as a Chair of an Institutional Review Board at her academic institution.

Maria Fernandez, PhD 
Director, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

An internationally known expert in the field of health promotion and cancer control and prevention, Dr. Fernandez has extensive experience in community-based participatory research in cancer control and prevention among underserved populations. She has conducted studies ranging from the description of conceptual models to the development and evaluation of interventions to increase cancer control and prevention. She has also worked to understand and accelerate the use of evidence-based interventions in real-world settings. Dr. Fernandez has received more than $12 million in funding as a principal investigator during the past five years and collaborates as a co-investigator on other studies. Her work is featured in 106 peer-reviewed publications and several book chapters. She also co-authored the book Planning Health Promotion Programs: An Intervention Mapping Approach.

Rahkshanda Rahman, MD, FRCS, FACS 
Director of the Amarillo Breast Center of Excellence and Professor of Surgery, School of Medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Dr. Rahman leads a CPRIT-funded prevention project, Access to Breast and Cervical Care for West Texas, which provides screenings and education for residents in 26 Texas Panhandle counties. She joined the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) in 2009 after serving as the founder and director of the interdisciplinary breast fellowship program at the University of Massachusetts. At TTUHSC, Dr. Rahman spearheaded formation of the first nationally accredited Breast Center of Excellence in the Texas Panhandle. Currently, she is the director of the Amarillo Breast Center of Excellence and professor of surgery for the TTUHSC School of Medicine. Dr. Rahman serves on numerous local and national boards and committees including the American Society of Breast Surgeons and the Amarillo Area Breast Health Coalition. She graduated from the Aga Khan University Medical College in Karachi, Pakistan, where she completed her internship and residency. She then spent several years furthering her studies, completing fellowships in breast and general surgery in 2001 at Aga Khan, followed by another fellowship at the University of Arkansas for the medical sciences division of surgical oncology.
Update on CPRIT-Funded Core Facility Research 

The goal of this session is to highlight several CPRIT supported core facilities that are developing forward looking strategies to support cancer research in Texas.

Moderators

James K.V. Willson, MD 
Chief Scientific Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Dr. Willson leads the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) academic research program in supporting innovation in cancer research and recruiting world-class cancer researchers to Texas institutions. He is nationally renowned for his work in the genetics of colorectal cancer, having spent more than three decades in the field. Dr. Willson’s research led to the development of cell and animal models for human colon cancer that have been key to identifying genetic factors in disease progression. Dr. Willson joined CPRIT in March 2016 following a distinguished career as director of Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and associate dean of oncology programs at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Under his leadership, Simmons Cancer Center became one of only 45 cancer centers in the U.S. to achieve comprehensive status from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). He helped bring the same prestigious designation to Case Comprehensive Cancer Center in Cleveland, where he served as its director from 1994-2004. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Willson earned his MD from the University of Alabama in 1976. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1981 and received additional training at the NCI.

Speakers

Funda Meric-Bernstam, MD 
Chair of the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics -- the Phase I Program, and Professor in the Divisions of Cancer Medicine and Surgery, and The Nellie B. Connally Chair in Breast Cancer
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

The Medical Director of the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy (IPCT), Dr. Meric-Bernstam has a basic and translational research program that is focused on molecular therapeutics, predominantly on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, to delineate the mechanism of action of each agent targeting this pathway and the molecular alterations useful to prospectively identify patients who will benefit most from each agent, and optimal combination therapies. Her research is focused on identifying molecular markers to predict and monitor drug response and novel biomarker-driven combinations.  As the Medical Director of the Institute for  Personalized Cancer Therapy at MD Anderson, she has not only led large efforts of genomic testing within the institution, but has a) helped build a framework for rapid assessment of actionability of genomic alterations; b) established a Precision Oncology Decision Support Team who can provide point of care input for actionability; c) launched the public website “www.personalizedcancertherapy.org” providing access to expert curation of information on therapeutic relevance of specific genes/variants; d) created databases and clinical trial alert systems to facilitate accrual to genotype-selected trials across the institution; and e) monitors trial enrollment after genomic testing to identify approaches to obstacles to trial enrollment. She has participated in, as well as led, trials including investigator-initiated trials, cooperative group trials, and industry sponsored trials. These trials have ranged from a window of opportunity trials, neoadjuvant therapy trials, a Phase I and II trials in the advanced cancer setting as well as new surgical techniques, new imaging devices and molecular diagnostics.

Gaudenz Danuser, PhD 
Chair of the Lyda Hill Department of Bioinformatics
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

In July 2015 Dr. Danuser was appointed as the inaugural chair of the Lyda Hill Department of Bioinformatics. He also holds the Patrick E. Haggerty Distinguished Chair in Basic Biomedical Science. Before moving to UT Southwestern, Dr. Danuser directed research laboratories at ETH Zurich (2002 – 2003), at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla (2003 – 2009), and at Harvard Medical School (2009 – 2014). Trained as an engineer (geodetic and electrical engineering/computer science), he entered the field of cell biology as a postdoctoral fellow in the Program for Architectural Dynamics of Living Cells at the MBL in Woods Hole. Since then, he has focused his research on the question how chemical and mechanical signals integrate in the regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics and membrane trafficking. He has redirected his efforts towards understanding the implications of mechanical and chemical cell shape regulation in migration and survival of the metastatic cell, including the roles mechanical cues play in conferring what his lab calls ‘mechanical drug resistance’. His contributions to cell biology and biophysics have been recognized by several awards and honors.

Martin M. Matzuk, MD, PhD 
Stuart A. Wallace Chair, Robert L. Moody, Sr. Chair, and Professor
Baylor College of Medicine and Director of Clinical Chemistry, Ben Taub General Hospital

Dr. Matzuk, Director of the Center for Drug Discovery at Baylor College of Medicine and Director of Clinical Chemistry at Ben Taub General Hospital, is recognized for his elucidation of TGFβ superfamily, germ cell, and hormonal signaling pathways in cancer and reproductive medicine using functional genomics approaches. He has published more than 320 papers (including over 25 papers in CellNature, and Science journals), generated over 100 mouse models, lectured in excess of 170 symposia in 27 countries, and has been supported continuously by the NIH since 1991. Based on Google Scholar, 100 of his papers have been cited over 100 times, and 25 papers have been cited over 400 times. Dr. Matzuk’s other honors include the Richard Weitzman Award from the Endocrine Society, HypoCCS Award from Eli Lilly, Society for the Study of Reproduction Research Award, Pfizer Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Society for Investigative Pathology, Roy Greep Award from The Endocrine Society, International Fundacion IVI Award in Reproductive Medicine, and a MERIT award from the NIH. He in an inventor on a dozen patents and has a highly successful therapeutic on the market. Dr. Matzuk was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and The Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas in 2014 and was elected as a Fellow in the National Academy of Inventors in 2016. He is the principal investigator on the CPRIT Core Facility Support Award “Preclinical Candidate Discovery Core.”

Michael Scheurer, PhD, MPH 
Director, Childhood Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Program Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology/Oncology
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Scheurer’s research focuses on viruses and immune function as risk factors for cancer development and progression. His laboratory looks for novel ways to identify and catalog molecular markers of viral infection, including host-virus interactions, as risk factors for the development of cancer. He is actively involved with two large international research groups focused on two rare tumors: the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium and the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Dr. Scheurer is currently working with other researchers and clinicians at Texas Children’s Cancer Center to develop a statewide study to examine risk factors for childhood brain tumors. He also currently has a research project examining Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers, in particular cervical cancer, including the examination of the HPV vaccine and its effects on cancer incidence. He has an increasing program looking at Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and host immune function in relation to pediatric and adult brain tumors, and he also has an interest in the factors that contribute to the poor prognosis and outcome for brain tumor patients, including neurocognitive decline and other therapy-related toxicities.
3:15 PM
Dissemination and Implementation – Strategies and Examples - cont.
CPRIT Academic Research RFA Funding Mechanisms 

Attend this session to hear about current and future funding opportunities for academic research.

Speakers

James K.V. Willson, MD 
Chief Scientific Officer
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Dr. Willson leads the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) academic research program in supporting innovation in cancer research and recruiting world-class cancer researchers to Texas institutions. He is nationally renowned for his work in the genetics of colorectal cancer, having spent more than three decades in the field. Dr. Willson’s research led to the development of cell and animal models for human colon cancer that have been key to identifying genetic factors in disease progression. Dr. Willson joined CPRIT in March 2016 following a distinguished career as director of Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and associate dean of oncology programs at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Under his leadership, Simmons Cancer Center became one of only 45 cancer centers in the U.S. to achieve comprehensive status from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). He helped bring the same prestigious designation to Case Comprehensive Cancer Center in Cleveland, where he served as its director from 1994-2004. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Willson earned his MD from the University of Alabama in 1976. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1981 and received additional training at the NCI.

Start-up Trials and Tribulations - cont.

Questions

Abstracts

Do I have to register to attend the conference in order to submit an abstract?

If your abstract is selected for one the poster sessions, registration is required to participate. Please visit http://register.cprit2017.org to register today. Individuals MUST prepare a poster of their work and be available during their assigned poster session.

When is the deadline for abstract submission?

The deadline for submitting abstracts has passed.

What are the guidelines for the formatting of abstracts?

Abstract body is limited to 400 words; body must include an Introduction, Methods, Results and Conclusion. Images and charts to accompany abstracts will NOT be accepted. The abstract submission deadline has passed.

Can I submit an abstract if I have not received CPRIT funding?

YES. We encourage anyone who has an innovative idea regarding cancer 
research or prevention to submit an abstract for consideration.

I don’t live in Texas. Can I still submit my abstract for consideration?

YES. The CPRIT conference is open to cancer specialists from across the country and we look forward to receiving applications from within and beyond the Texas borders.

I am trying to submit my abstract, but I do not see my organization listed in the drop-down list.

Please contact abstracts@cprit.texas.gov to submit your organization’s name and we will ensure it is added to the selection list.

I am trying to submit my abstract that directly correlates with a CPRIT funded project, but I do not know my Grant ID number (e.g., PP160001).

If the abstract that you are submitting directly correlates to a CPRIT funded project, you must enter your grant ID. If you do not know your grant ID number, please contact CPRIT at abstracts@cprit.texas.gov.

May I submit more than one abstract?

Yes, CPRIT accepts multiple abstracts from the same author or CPRIT grantee.

How will participants be notified of their abstract's acceptance or status?

Participants will be notified of their abstract's acceptance via e-mail.

What are the dimensions of the abstract presentation posters?

Posters will be displayed in landscape format on boards 84 inches wide by 42 inches tall.

How will I know which session my accepted poster has been assigned?

Presenting authors will be notified of the assigned poster session (Session A or Session B) via email. Authors should remain available during their assigned poster session to answer questions.

When can I remove my poster?

All posters should remain on the assigned poster board until BOTH poster sessions have taken place. If you are in Session A, please keep your poster displayed until after the end of Session B.

Cancellation and Substitutions

I have already registered, but I can no longer attend. Can one of my colleagues attend in my place?

Conference attendee substitutions can be made at any time through November 1, 2017, at no additional cost. If you would like to request a substitution, please email: registration@cprit.state.tx.us and provide the name and email address of the person originally registered and contact information (e.g. phone and email) of the person who will be taking their place. Responses should be received within two business days.

Note: Attendees who originally registered under the general admission rate who wish to substitute a student registration instead, will not receive a student discount. Alternatively, attendees originally registered under the student category, who wish to substitute a general admission attendee instead may be subject to an increased registration rate.

What is your cancellation policy?

Cancellation requests will incur a 20% processing fee, per registration, until October 13, 2017 midnight CT and after that date/time, payments will no longer be refundable. To request a registration cancellation, please email: registration@cprit.texas.gov. Responses should be received within two business days.

Payment

How can I obtain a copy of CPRIT’s W-9 form for my organization’s reimbursement process?

CPRIT’s W-9 can be downloaded here.

What forms of payment are accepted for registration?

Credit Cards

(American Express, Visa, MasterCard)

Checks

Please make checks payable to Cancer Prevention and Research Institute and reference 2017 Conference on the memo line to ensure accurate processing.
(CPRIT Taxpayer Identification Number 26-2482534.)

Purchase Orders

Purchase orders can be submitted for registration payments via fax, email or US mail.

CPRIT’s Mailing Address and Contact Information for Checks and Purchase Orders:

Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas
ATTN: Michelle Huddleston/2017 Conference
PO Box 12097
Austin, Texas 78711

Fax: 512-475-2563
ATTN: Michelle Huddleston/2017 Conference
Email: registration@cprit.texas.gov

Registration

Are registrants allowed to bring guests?

Each conference attendee is required to register, therefore, guests are not allowed at this time.

How much does it cost to attend the conference?

Before October 13, 2017 at midnight Central time our attendee rates are:

General Admission: $375.00
Student/Community Advocate: $250.00

After October 13, 2017 at midnight Central time, late registration starts and our rates increase to:

General Admission: $405.00
Student/Community Advocate: $280.00

Is there a special registration rate for state government employees?

There is no discounted rate for state government employees.

I’m having trouble completing my registration, how can I contact support?

For general registration system support, please contact our helpdesk:

Email: registration@cprit.texas.gov
Please allow up to 48 business hours for response

Under which registration category should I register?

Choose Student/Community Advocacy if you are currently enrolled in an accredited college, university or professional school/program or if you currently work/volunteer for a community-based organization.

NOTE: When checking in to the conference, Students must show a valid student ID and Community Advocates must provide an affiliate letter on official organization letterhead in order to receive registration discounts.

Speaker should only be used if you have been contacted by the agency’s conference planning team and are an accepted conference speaker.


Contact

For registration or general conference related support, please contact us at:

Email: registration@cprit.texas.gov

For abstract submittal, topic or other related questions, please contact us at:

Email: abstracts@cprit.texas.gov

Email support requests are answered within a 48 business hour period.

 

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